Passion Flower Herb 4 oz

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  • Regular price $10.80


Passion flower is one of 500 or so species that make up the Passifloraceae family of flowering plants and vines, many of which produce exceptionally showy blooms with an abundance of nectar that attract insects and birds.

P. incarnata is one of the hardiest species of passion flower and is commonly found thriving in wayside pastures, thickets and along river banks of the southeastern United States. In fact, passion flower is the state flower of Tennessee.

The aerial parts of the plant—leaves, flowers and stems—are widely used in herbal tea blends. Passion flower has a particular reputation for inducing a state of calm and relaxation. It's also quite tasty, on its own or mixed with other herbs, flowers or fruit peels.


Description: Passion flower is one of 500 or so species that make up the Passifloraceae family of flowering plants and vines, many of which produce exceptionally showy blooms with an abundance of nectar that attract insects and birds. P. incarnata is one of the hardiest species and is commonly found thriving in wayside pastures, thickets and along river banks of the southeastern United States. In fact, passion flower is that state flower of Tennessee.
Traditional Uses: Native Americans made tea from the leaves and roots of passion flower it is used as a bath additive to induce relaxation.

Chemical Composition: Passion flower contains a variety of flavonoid compounds and cyanogenic glycosides. P. incarnata is one of the species in this family of plants that contains harmala alkaloids.

Safety: Passion flower is considered safe in therapeutic dosages, but should not be used during pregnancy or lactation. This herb may interfere with certain sedative medications, including tricyclic antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs. Passion flower may also increase the effects of blood-thinning medications and increase the risk of bleeding.